DIN / ASA / ISO

Nowadays, light sensitivity is most commonly specified in ISO rates. In an ISO rate DIN and ASA are specified. Often (nearly all digital cameras) sensitivity is indicated in ISO but due to readability, only the ASA rate is displayed. .

DIN, ASA and ISO in photography are used to describe the light sensitivity of video material or of digital cameras.

ASA - American Standard Association
ISO - International Standard Organisation
DIN - Deutsches Institut für Normung (German institute of norms)

Respective scales can easily be converted. The starting rate is 12. Both ASA and DIN mark the same level of light sensitivity. If the DIN rate is respectively increased by three, the ASA rate and the light sensitivity double. This means that less light is needed for a correct exposure. If the DIN rates are reduced by three levels, the ASA rates and also the light sensitivity will be halved. In doing so, rounding errors occur in the ASA rates- e.g. 15 DIN results in an ASA rate of 25 instead of 24.

Nowadays, light sensitivity is most commonly specified in ISO rates. In an ISO rate DIN and ASA are specified. Often (nearly all digital cameras) sensitivity is indicated in ISO but due to readability, only the ASA rate is displayed.

At the same time, these rates suggest certain amount of film grain and noise effects (restricted) on films/digital cameras.

Conversion table

DIN

ASA

ISO

 

Increase in light sensitivity

Pfeil-Tabelle

 

9

6

6/9°

 

10

 

8

 

8/10°

 

11

 

10

 

10/11°

 

12

 

12

 

12/12°

 

13

 

16

 

16/13°

 

14

 

20

 

20/14°

 

15

25

25/15°

 

16

 

32

 

32/16°

 

17

 

40

 

40/17°

 

18

 

50

 

50/18°

 

19

 

64

 

64/19°

 

20

 

80

 

80/20°

 

21

 

100

 

100/21°

 

22

 

125

 

125/22°

 

23

 

160

 

160/23°

 

24

 

200

 

200/24°

 

25

 

250

 

250/25°

 

26

 

320

 

320/26°

 

27

 

400

 

400/27°

 

Connection between ISO rate and image quality

You can find more information about light sensitivity / Film speed here: